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Applewood Estate

Applewood was built in 1916 as a gentleman's farm for the Charles Stewart Mott family and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The home and grounds encompass approximately 34 acres that include an orchard with 29 varieties of heritage apples and 18 acres that are extensively landscaped. The original gatehouse, barn and chicken coop complete the estate.

Ruth Mott generously gave Applewood to the Ruth Mott Foundation, bestowing full responsibility for the estate upon her passing in 1999. Rooted in the Mott legacy of philanthropy, Applewood continues to embody the family's commitment to the community. This historic treasure, paired with spectacular grounds, skilled staff and forward-looking goals has become a vital component of the Foundation's philanthropic work beyond grantmaking. It serves as a living laboratory, an inspiring location for gatherings, a center for learning through its public on-site programs, and a base from which its staff support grantees and community initiatives.

In less than a decade, Applewood has been transformed from a private family estate into a model for the community where values are translated into action.



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Friendly Frog

Marshall Fredericks

Terrazzo and Concrete; 6600 lbs; 63

Installed in 2004

This smiling amphibian was created out of terrazzo and concrete by renowned sculptor Marshall Fredericks (1908-98). Commissioned in 1970 for the opening of the Genesee Valley Shopping Center, Friendly Frog quickly became a favorite for the children visiting the mall. Friendly Frog was brought to Applewood in 2004.  His new "pad" includes a colorful slip-resistant surface, water features, seating and pots of beautiful flowers.

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Marble Wellhead

Importers: A. Olivotti & Co.

Marble; 52" Diameter; 32" High

Installed in 1992

The marble wellhead was purchased and brought to Applewood in 1918 from Florence, Italy. Today the wellhead contains a gurgling fountain that brings the sound of water to the garden. Playful cherubs adorn the wellhead. An inscription around the edge reads "Homines humileque mijcinas lymphae jurant," which translated means, "The great, the lowly, and the tamarisk enjoy the waters."
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The Birdbath

Original: Marshall Field & Co. Replica: Bybee Stone Company Inc.

Limestone; 43" High

Installed in 1918

The original birdbath was made out of cement and was purchased for $40 in May, 1918, from Marshall Field & Company, Chicago IL. The replica was installed in the same location in May, 1992, and is made out of dressed Indiana limestone from Bybee Stone Company Inc., Bloomington, IN.
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Story Circles

Guy Adamec

Mosaic Tile on Concrete; 5' Long

Installed in 2004

"Story Circles" began with individuals from the community telling stories of joy and celebration in their lives. These stories were interpreted by the artist and five common themes were woven together to form the bench top. Freedom, Dancing, Planting, Brotherhood and Family are depicted in a circular motif.

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La Brezza

Florentine Craftsmen, Inc.

Lead Sculpture; Pompeian Green Finish; 43" High

Installed in 1996

In Italian, "La Brezza" means "The Breeze", which is an appropriate description of this delicate sculpture that overlooks the beauty of the flowers in the Demonstration Garden. She was purchased from Florentine Craftsmen, Inc. for Mrs. Mott's 95th birthday by friends, staff and family.
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Columnar Construction

Richard Hunt

Stainless Steel; Abstract Sculpture; 40' High

Installed in 2011

The three-and-a-half-ton sculpture was created by Richard Hunt, acclaimed nationally for his fluid designs and his love of public art. Titled Columnar Construction, it is a gift from the Mott-Warsh collection to the Ruth Mott Foundation and Applewood. The sculpture commemorates the 110th birthday of Ruth Mott.
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Risky Intentions

Chakaia Booker

Stainless steel and rubber

Installed in 2007

Chakaia Booker’s sculptures are constructed of salvaged rubber, primarily old tires, that she cuts into strips and shapes into fluid forms using the qualities of the material to define the character of each work. Her intention is to translate materials into imagery that will stimulate people to consider themselves as part of the environment - one piece of it. She says, “I believe art should dialogue with viewers.”

Risky Intentions was created in 2007. It is on loan from the Mott-Warsh Collection, a privately owned, publically shared collection of American fine art that is based here in Flint.

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Anvil's Reach

Richard Hunt

Cor-Ton steel, abstract sculpture

Installed in 1986

Richard Hunt describes his work as a “...kind of bridge between what we experience in nature and what we experience in the urban, industrial technology-driven society we live in.” Like his sculpture Columnar Construction, at the edge of the Gilkey Creek Trail, Anvil’s Reach invites us to reflect on the blending of natural and industrial forms and the beauty in both.

Anvil’s Reach was created in 1986 and is on loan from the Mott-Warsh Collection, a privately owned, publically shared collection of American fine art that is based here in Flint.

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Green Garden Shed

What has four walls and a garden on top? It’s Applewood’s Green Garden Shed! This little storage building has a specially designed Green Roof on the west side that we’ve topped with sun-loving plants and herbs. These plants absorb rainwater and give it back to the air so it can become rain again! When water runs off roofs and streets, it mixes with oil and gas from cars and trucks and then drains into lakes and streams. That dirty water is not healthy for critters like frogs and fish.

Green roofs also provide insulation so the building stays cooler in summer and warmer in winter.

The east side of the roof has shingles so rain water can run off and be collected in a rain barrel. We use that water in the gardens when the weather is dry. The rain water also runs off the roof into a rain garden, which is a shallow depression in the ground planted with water-loving plants. This special garden allows collected rain water to seep slowly into the soil. Any water that isn’t needed will be absorbed deep into the ground to an aquifer, which eventually becomes drinking water!

Do you recycle? Next to the Green Garden Shed is a gray box made from recycled milk jugs, just like the furniture in our seating area! Into that box we put weeds, leaves and grass clippings plus fruit and vegetable "trash" from the kitchen, such as banana peels and apple cores. Over time, it becomes "compost." It looks like good, rich dirt, and we put it back into the soil where it feeds our plants and helps them grow strong and healthy.

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Green Garden Shed

What has four walls and a garden on top? It’s Applewood’s Green Garden Shed! This little storage building has a specially designed Green Roof on the west side that we’ve topped with sun-loving plants and herbs. These plants absorb rainwater and give it back to the air so it can become rain again! When water runs off roofs and streets, it mixes with oil and gas from cars and trucks and then drains into lakes and streams. That dirty water is not healthy for critters like frogs and fish.

Green roofs also provide insulation so the building stays cooler in summer and warmer in winter.

The east side of the roof has shingles so rain water can run off and be collected in a rain barrel. We use that water in the gardens when the weather is dry. The rain water also runs off the roof into a rain garden, which is a shallow depression in the ground planted with water-loving plants. This special garden allows collected rain water to seep slowly into the soil. Any water that isn’t needed will be absorbed deep into the ground to an aquifer, which eventually becomes drinking water!

Do you recycle? Next to the Green Garden Shed is a gray box made from recycled milk jugs, just like the furniture in our seating area! Into that box we put weeds, leaves and grass clippings plus fruit and vegetable "trash" from the kitchen, such as banana peels and apple cores. Over time, it becomes "compost." It looks like good, rich dirt, and we put it back into the soil where it feeds our plants and helps them grow strong and healthy.

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Demonstration Garden

This colorful garden changes every year! We use it to show you many kinds of flowers, vegetables and herbs that you can grow in your own garden. We also use it to show you different materials that can be used for paths and to edge your garden.

This year, you’ll find everything here from A to Z! Can you find plants that start with the letter K or Q or M?

Take a taste! Some of the plants in this garden will be familiar to you. Taste a mint leaf. Does it remind you of pizza? How about candy? Or maybe chocolate chip mint ice cream! Try some others such as basil, chives and stevia. Are they familiar flavors?

Have you seen something jump in the water lily pond? That’s our friend the green frog. What else do you think lives in the pond?

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Demonstration Garden

This colorful garden changes every year! We use it to show you many kinds of flowers, vegetables and herbs that you can grow in your own garden. We also use it to show you different materials that can be used for paths and to edge your garden.

This year, you’ll find everything here from A to Z! Can you find plants that start with the letter K or Q or M?

Take a taste! Some of the plants in this garden will be familiar to you. Taste a mint leaf. Does it remind you of pizza? How about candy? Or maybe chocolate chip mint ice cream! Try some others such as basil, chives and stevia. Are they familiar flavors?

Have you seen something jump in the water lily pond? That’s our friend the green frog. What else do you think lives in the pond?

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Pollination Station

Did you know that one blue orchard bee can pollinate more than 2,000 apple blossoms in one day?

The apple trees in our heritage orchard need bees to pollinate the blossoms in order to produce fruit. Honeybees, blue orchard bees and bumblebees all help with this very important job. Apple blossoms bloom for only a short time in spring, so to encourage the bees to live here at Applewood, we created a Diversity Garden with many kinds of native Michigan plants that flower from early spring through late fall, providing food and shelter for the bees for several months.

Blue orchard bees are small and look more like a fly than a bee. Like all bees, only the females have stingers, but they are very gentle and seldom sting people. Blue orchard bees are solitary and often nest in beetle tunnels in trees or other small holes in wood.

Bumblebees are very social and live together in underground nests made of old squirrel or gopher holes or inside hollow trees. They are large and can carry a lot of pollen as they move from tree to tree, and that’s important because apple blossoms need pollen from different trees in order to turn into an apple fruit.

Honeybees also live together in colonies. Unlike the blue orchard bees and bumblebees that are active in all kinds of weather, honeybees prefer being active on sunny warm days.

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Perennial Garden

Perennials are flowers that come up every year. They appear to die in the fall and usually disappear altogether in the winter, but come spring, they send up new growth and continue their life cycle.
This perennial garden has more than 90 varieties! Some may be familiar to you such as the beloved peonies, delphiniums, shasta daisies and chrysanthemums.

Most perennials bloom at a specific time. For example, peonies are full of blossoms in June and usually done by July. Chrysanthemums don’t bloom until late summer. With careful planning and planting, we have created a perennial garden that has a colorful display of flowers throughout the entire growing season. To add interest, we intersperse the perennials with annuals, which are planted in the spring, bloom vigorously into fall and die when the weather turns frosty.

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Apple Orchard

CS Mott loved his apple orchard, and on this one acre of land, you’ll find 29 varieties of heritage or “antique” apple trees - the same varieties that Mr. Mott grew almost 100 years ago!

You may recognize some, such as Jonathon and McIntosh, that are still favorites today, but others, such as Duchess of Oldenburg, Snow and Red Gravenstein are seldom available anymore. To preserve these rare and tasty old varieties, members of the Applewood horticulture staff graft new trees with buds from the original trees.

The result is a vibrant orchard that produces fruit beginning in late July with Yellow Transparent and continuing through early November until the last Golden Russet is picked. Some of the apples are excellent for cooking and others are best eating fresh out of your hand!

The apples are shared with visitors at our fall festival and are donated to the Food Bank of Eastern Michigan and other community groups. You can help keep these old varieties from disappearing, too, by planting them in your own garden or orchard.

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Sugar Maple

The branches of this magnificent tree create the feeling of a wonderful outdoor room! In the spring, the leaves are a bright, fresh green. In the summer, the tree’s shade is cool and inviting. And in the fall, the leaves turn glorious shades of gold and orange, which make the tree seem to glow!

Sugar maples grow in most hardwood forests in the northern and central regions of the U.S. They are one of the major sources of sap for making maple syrup, and their dense wood is ideal for both furniture and flooring. Bowling pins and bowling alleys are frequently made from maple wood. It’s also used for basketball courts, baseball bats and making musical instruments. While it’s very strong, it’s flexible, which makes it a preferred wood for making archery bows.

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Giant Eastern Cottonwood

Applewood is fortunate to have many wonderful old trees, and this giant eastern cottonwood is one of our favorites. It was on the survey of the grounds taken in 1915, so we know it is well over 100 years old. In the right environment, cottonwoods can live to be 400 years old.

This stately specimen measures more than 16 feet around and won Genesee County’s Biggest Tree contest in 1998 and 2007.

The Kansas state legislature designated the cottonwood the official state tree of Kansas in 1937, calling it the “pioneer of the prairie.”

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Native Plant Garden

One of our goals at Applewood is to work in partnership with nature and to use environmentally friendly ways to control problems caused by insect pests. For example, we encourage beneficial insects such as ladybugs, praying mantids and green lacewings which are natural enemies of pests, to make their homes in our gardens, and we do that by planting many different kinds of plants that they like.

This garden contains several favorites of the “good guys” such as dill, ox eye sunflower, liatris, wild lupine, wild geranium, lanceleaf tickseed and garden heliotrope. These plants attract and sustain beneficial insects so they establish natural populations here and move into areas such as the apple orchard when they are needed to control pests.

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Cutting Garden

When members of the Mott family lived here, most of the flowers that found their way into arrangements in the residence from April to October came from the estate’s own cutting garden. It was planted with annuals, perennials and bulbs to assure an ample supply of blossoms throughout the growing season. The tradition of the cutting garden continues at Applewood, and flowers for the residence still come from this colorful “working” garden!

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Rose Garden

Mrs. Mott loved flowers, and the blossoms from her carefully tended rose bushes lent their fragrant beauty to arrangements for her home throughout the summer. Today, the rose garden contains 180 hybrid tea, floribunda and climbing roses along with colorful annuals and Siberian iris. In late summer they are accented by stunning mallow hibiscus flowers that are eight inches across! Enjoy the colors and fragrances, and walk under the elegant rose trellises just as Mrs. Mott did nearly 100 years ago.  

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Friendly Frog

Marshall Fredericks

Terrazzo and Concrete; 6600 lbs; 63" High

Friendly is everyone's favorite frog! Many grownups first met him when he lived at the Genesee Valley Shopping Center here in Flint 40 years ago. He came to live at Applewood in 2004, and now a whole new generation of kids can climb on him and enjoy his big smile. His "pad" is one of the most popular places for visitors to take photographs! Friendly Frog was created by sculptor Marshall Fredericks in 1970.
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Gatehouse

This quaint cottage located just inside the Kearsley Street entrance was home to Applewood’s farm manager, Arthur Hatherly, and his family from 1917 – 1949. It was built in a style similar to the house and outbuildings, with a brick exterior and slate roof. Though it appears from the outside to be quite small, the space was used efficiently. The first floor has a living room, dining area and kitchen. Two bedrooms and a bathroom occupy the second floor.

Mr. Hatherly was essential to the success of farm operations and he was involved in every aspect. His name appears frequently in Mr. Mott’s diary and correspondence, often referencing their conversations together. This comical story is reported in Mr. Mott’s diary dated August 9, 1932: “We all made an inspection of the horses, pigs, cows and pond. Found a lot of boys taking a free ride on our Percheron truck horses. When they saw me, they beat it off; later, they came back and asked if I objected. I said I did not, but could not answer for Hatherly. Shortly Hatherly appeared, gave them the devil and chased them away.”

When Mr. Hatherly retired, Mr. Mott phased out farming operations at Applewood. The Ruth Mott Foundation archives were located here in the Gate House for a time. It was recently renovated and is now used as a guest house.

 

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Chicken Coop

 The chicken coop was built as the same time as the house and barn and in the same style, complete with a brick façade and slate roof. It was a stylish dwelling for leghorns, rock roosters and rock specials who provided both eggs and meat for the family’s meals.

On April 20, 1931, Mr. Mott noted in his diary, “We have five geese, one of which is sitting on a dozen eggs in the hen house and we hope for good results from her. Regarding the chickens: Hatherly bought 100 roosters five or six weeks old, weighing one-half pound each, and they will begin to be ready for table in thirty days and will keep us going in good shape until our regular crop matures later in the summer.”

Farm records from May 21, 1934 show the chickens maintained good egg production through the winter: January 270 eggs, February 293 eggs, March 427 eggs and April 437 eggs. Eggs that were not needed for the family were given away or sold.

These days, the chicken coop is used for work space for community art projects such as the mosaic sign now located at the Flint Farmers’ Market and mosaic benches placed at Grace Emmanuel Church, the Boys and Girls Club, the University of Michigan-Flint and here at Applewood.

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Barn

This impressive building was constructed at the same time as the house, and in the same style. It was home to the Mott’s award-winning Holstein-Fresian cows who were often named for family members and friends, plus riding horses, pigeons and Percheron draft horses that were used in the fields in place of tractors.

Mr. Mott wanted the barn to be outfitted with state-of-the-art conveniences, so it had hot and cold water, a sanitary drain, electricity and an overhead track system that was used to transport manure and soiled animal bedding out of the barn.

Instead of a typical a concrete floor, the Mott’s horses and cows stood on floors made of cork bricks, which reduced the likelihood that they would have foot and leg problems. Walls and fences were whitewashed. Besides giving the place a fresh, clean look, whitewash is highly alkaline due to its lime base, so it resists the growth of mildew, mold and bacteria.

The second floor of the barn was designed with an eye for making winter chores as easy as possible. Hay, grain and straw were stored there under the cathedral-like roof, and chutes allowed the farmhands to pitch supplies down to the animals. Carrying water in buckets to farm animals was typically a cold, wet job in winter, but in the Mott’s barn, water was transported by hose.

Mr. Mott was a prolific writer, which gives us insight into farm life at Applewood. On April 20, 1931 he wrote, “We have four milking cows and three growing heifers, one of which I believe will freshen this summer. During the last few weeks two more baby heifers arrived, so that gives us nine head in all, which is probably more than we need...We also have a litter of nine young pigs, which should take care of our requirements."

Applewood’s barn is the last remaining early 20th century barn in Southeast Michigan that is in its original condition and location, with original fixtures, open to the public and connected to a family farm.

 

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Pool

The elegant pool was five feet deep when constructed for swimming in 1916. It was the site of many parties and was used throughout the summer by family and friends. Visiting children often changed into their swimming clothes by ducking into the surrounding bushes.

In 1981, as an 80th birthday gift for his mother, Ruth Mott, Stewart Mott had the depth of the pool changed to 18 inches, and he installed a majestic fountain with lights that changed its colors. The current fountain was installed in the past decade.

The toads on the side of the pool were a gift to C.S. from his sister, Edith Mott, and her husband, Herbert Davis, architect of the home.

C.S. Mott wrote this observation in his diary on Saturday, April 2, 1932, shortly after receiving the toads: "The two stone toads that Edith and Herbert sent me arrived safely and they have been placed on the border of the pool. I heard a big barking this morning and it appeared that Snuffy (a 12-year-old Chihuahua) had just discovered them and she was out there barking and walking around for nearly an hour before she would get at all close to them. They are very interesting and I wish to thank Edith and Herbert for them."

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Garage/Loft

The attached, heated, four-car garage was constructed at the same time as the home, and originally featured four sets of white wooden French-style garage doors. A small adjacent workshop that was stocked with tools is now an accessible bathroom available to visitors when the grounds are open.

The second floor of the garage provided living quarters for John Mair, horticulturist and grounds keeper at Applewood, and his family. Later it housed security offices, and it’s now office space for programming staff.

A tunnel runs underneath the greenhouse connecting the basement of the house to the basement of the garage.

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Terrace

The outdoor terrace on the south side of the house was covered with a bright awning in summer and provided a cool, shady sitting area for family and visitors. It also afforded a lovely view of the grounds. A swimming pool just beyond the terrace was installed when the house was built and later converted to the fountain you see now.

 

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Residence

In 1915, CS Mott purchased two adjacent parcels of land - a total of nearly 65 acres at the edge of downtown Flint. He commissioned his brother-in-law, Herbert Davis, to work with landscape architect, William Pitkin, Jr., and asked the two to design a practical family home that would be at the heart of a self-sustaining farm.

Records show that Mr. Mott was offered two house styles. One option was an ornate Victorian design, popular in the U.S. in the mid- to late-1800s. The other was the “Jacobean Revival” that you see here, which was favored by new industrialists and business leaders and was considered a more “restrained” style.

Construction was completed in 1917. The projected cost of the house was $72,100, which included the architect’s fee of $2,100.

The exterior of the home is primarily brick with limestone trim around the window and door frames. The roof is covered in five shades of variegated slate. There are 35 rooms on three floors, including maids’ quarters on the third floor, and a full basement with a two-lane bowling alley, a billiard room and a laundry. A bright gallery runs along the south side of the home, extending to the living room at one end and the dining room at the other. 

Directly off the kitchen is a cozy breakfast room with a door to the adjacent greenhouse where vegetables were grown for the family.

The gracious residence was home to Mott family members until Ruth Mott passed away here January 25, 1999. The interior was restored in 20xx, and its first-floor rooms are now used by the Ruth Mott Foundation to host convenings and community meetings.

View Photos Of Inside The Residence

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Tea House

The Tea House anchors one corner of the perennial garden, and it’s where you’ll often find musicians playing during open days at Applewood. It provided a shady location for afternoon tea and judging from old photos, it was a fun place for Mott children and their friends to play. The now-grown grandson of one of Applewood’s gardener remembers that there was a sandbox in the Tea House when he visited as a young boy.  

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Strolling Saturday

Saturday, May 09, 2015

noon-4:00pm

1400 E. Kearsley Street
[View Map]

A new opportunity to explore Applewood in a casual setting. Take a walk in a lovely place!

Join us on the second Saturday of each month, May-October.

Guests welcome from Noon to 4 p.m.
These events are free and open to everyone.

Bring Your Lunch & Learn

Thursday, May 21, 2015

11:00 am - 2:00 pm

1400 E. Kearsley Street
[View Map]

Come stroll the grounds of Applewood from 11 am to 2 pm and soak in the beauty of Mother Nature.

An optional short learning session will be presented at noon.

Bring a sack-lunch for a date at Applewood! All ages welcome.

May 21 Topic:

~ Pollinators & Native Plants~

FREE Event

Bring Your Lunch & Learn

Thursday, June 11, 2015

11:00 am - 2:00 pm

1400 E. Kearsley Street
[View Map]

Come stroll the grounds of Applewood from 11 am to 2 pm and soak in the beauty of Mother Nature.

An optional short learning session will be presented at noon.

Bring a sack-lunch for a date at Applewood! All ages welcome.

  June 11 Topic:

~ Rose Care~

FREE Event

Strolling Saturday

Saturday, June 13, 2015

noon-4:00pm

1400 E. Kearsley Street
[View Map]

A new opportunity to explore Applewood in a casual setting. Take a walk in a lovely place!

Join us on the second Saturday of each month, May-October.

Guests welcome from Noon to 4 p.m.
These events are free and open to everyone.

Getting Artsy @ Applewood!

Thursday, June 18, 2015

5:00 pm - 8:00 pm

1400 E. Kearsley Street
[View Map]

FREE EVENT!

Enjoy a fun filled day as you and your family explore the Applewood grounds filled with art activities for all ages including chalk art, face painting & more! Listen to live entertainment and arts and crafts for kids!

Golf cart shuttles are available for those with mobility challenges.

Entertainment:

~Exquisite Band featuring Gwen Pennyman-Hemphill

~Culturas Del Sol ~

~Tapology ~

For more information, call 810-233-3835, or visit applewood.org/events.

*All events are FREE at Applewood.

Applewood is on Kearsley Street right next to Flint’s Cultural Center. Parking is always FREE in the Applewood lot. Look for our entrance sign at the light where Kearsley Street meets Longway Boulevard.

Strolling Saturday

Saturday, July 11, 2015

noon-4:00pm

1400 E. Kearsley Street
[View Map]

A new opportunity to explore Applewood in a casual setting. Take a walk in a lovely place!

Join us on the second Saturday of each month, May-October.

Guests welcome from Noon to 4 p.m.
These events are free and open to everyone.

Bring Your Lunch & Learn

Thursday, July 16, 2015

11:00 am - 2:00 pm

1400 E. Kearsley Street
[View Map]

Come stroll the grounds of Applewood from 11 am to 2 pm and soak in the beauty of Mother Nature.

An optional short learning session will be presented at noon.

Bring a sack-lunch for a date at Applewood! All ages welcome.

  July 16 Topic:

~ Landscapes Aggravations......Tips & Tricks to Avoid Them~

FREE Event

Firefly Walk

Thursday, July 23, 2015

5:00 pm - 8:00 pm

1400 E. Kearsley Street
[View Map]

~FIREFLY WALK @ Applewood~

FREE EVENT!

Join Applewood and the Flint Cultural Center for the Fourth Annual Firefly Walk. This FREE family event will host a variety of fantastic activities such as live music, vintage baseball demonstration, children's arts & crafts, refreshments & MORE!!!!

*The grounds of Applewood will be open for strolling and visitors will enjoy many activities all around the grounds.

*For more information call 810.233.3835 or visit applewood.org or flintculturalcenter.org

Goodies from the Garden

Thursday, August 13, 2015

5:00 pm - 8:00 pm

1400 E. Kearsley Street
[View Map]

~Goodies from the Garden~
Thursday, August 13th from 5:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Experience a fun filled evening as you and your family explore the Applewood grounds decked out with activities and entertainment around every corner.

Live performances & more!!

Golf cart shuttles are available for those with mobility challenges.

*All events are FREE at Applewood.

Bring Your Lunch & Learn

Thursday, August 06, 2015

11:00 am - 2:00 pm

1400 E. Kearsley Street
[View Map]

Come stroll the grounds of Applewood from 11 am to 2 pm and soak in the beauty of Mother Nature.

An optional short learning session will be presented at noon.

Bring a sack-lunch for a date at Applewood! All ages welcome.

  August 6 Topic:

~ TBD~

FREE Event

Strolling Saturday

Saturday, August 08, 2015

noon-4:00pm

1400 E. Kearsley Street
[View Map]

A new opportunity to explore Applewood in a casual setting. Take a walk in a lovely place!

Join us on the second Saturday of each month, May-October.

Guests welcome from Noon to 4 p.m.
These events are free and open to everyone.

Strolling Saturday

Saturday, September 12, 2015

noon-4:00pm

1400 E. Kearsley Street
[View Map]

A new opportunity to explore Applewood in a casual setting. Take a walk in a lovely place!

Join us the second Saturday of the month, May through October.

o May 9
o June 13
o July 11
o August 8
o September 12
o October 10

Guests welcome from Noon to 4 p.m
These events are free and open to everyone